Overtone Music Network

a common space & database for harmonic overtones

I went to the cemetery to find a quiet place to sing. In this video I try out "ezengileer", a substyle of "kargryaa", and a style I just made up on the spot that day.

This content has been seen 380 times

Tags: throat_singing
Favorite of 1 person

Comment by Steve Sklar on September 27, 2010 at 5:43pm
Interesting stuff, Alexander and cool you're making up some of your own sounds. However, maybe it's the recording, but I don't hear the alternating nasal resonance of ezengileer.

Kudos,

Steve
Comment by Sauli Heikkilä on September 28, 2010 at 7:18am
In Mongolia they have khoomei called nose-khoomei. Maybe the first was nose kargyra. I understand also that ezengileer needs the "klang" that imitates sound of ezengileer or espuela in Spanish and English (spur?). Is it ok to use back of the tongue, Steve? Here is Ayan-ool Sam. Best ezengileer sounds after 2.30: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DrZ6GOaWAA
Is´nt it funny why we westernes are so anxious to put tags on things. You have pretty good sound, btw.
Comment by Soheyla B. Fahimi on September 28, 2010 at 10:21am
wow!!! thanks for sharing this amazing video :0)
Comment by Alexander Glenfield on September 28, 2010 at 4:58pm
@ Steve Thanks Steve! When I first started listening and imitating, I went to your website first, and that was back in 2000. Thanks for all those fine examples.

I learned ezengileer by listening to Alydn-ool Sevek's example on the disc that accompanies Mark Van Tongeren's book. In the example on the videos, I feel that I might be raising the base of the tongue while simultaneously "flapping" the epiglottis to divert sound into the nasal cavity.
Comment by Alexander Glenfield on September 28, 2010 at 5:03pm
@ Sauli Thanks for the link to the fine example. A very subtle sound, and I do like subtleties.

Yes, Sauli, the tendency to classify seems to be a neurotic tendency characteristic of westerners, but the need to make sense of things by naming them is inherent in every culture. Vocal physiology, however, varies from individual to individual enough that, to a degree, every individual's sound is a unique style unto itself.

Isn't it beautiful to know that we cannot ever completely replicate any sound we hear outside ourselves? Different, yet the same. A kind of changing same.
Comment by Alexander Glenfield on September 28, 2010 at 5:05pm
@ Soheyla Thank you for your kind words! This is a site is an archive of amazement, and it pleases me to hear that I might be able to make a worthy contribution.

Be well,
Alex
Comment by Julian Gregory on October 11, 2010 at 2:54am
Thanks so much for sharing your beautiful talents. I like the sub titles you add.
Comment by Alexander Glenfield on October 11, 2010 at 5:06pm
@Julian Thanks and I'll see you around on Facebook, too.
Comment by Alexander Glenfield on October 11, 2010 at 5:12pm
@ Dan Hey Dan: You must procure a copy of Mark van Tongeren's book with the accompanying CD. I believe the best way to get it is through the Tuva Trader (http://www.scs-intl.com/trader/tuva_books.htm) Regarding the getting of the right sound, I believe you must be careful with imitating. Rather than try to sound like someone else, just tweak your own sound until you find the sound you prefer.
However, if you feel stuck in your present sound, you might need a change in tongue position and the location or degree of laryngeal tension.

Have you ever played a brass instrument?

Alex
Comment by Steve Sklar on October 11, 2010 at 6:17pm
It's kinda tricky, as terms change in meaning over time. But there are some constants: the technique behind the style involves the rhythmic opening and closing of the nasal port. Other things may be occurring as well, ornamentally as well as including the basic technique such as khoomei vs kargyraa vs sygyt or combinations of those. The mouth may be open or closed, but usually is not wide open (very tough this way).

Sauli, I agree that one can get great percussive sounds by using the tongue and I do that a lot, but ezengileer really requires the technique of isolating and controlling the nasal port directly. Let's play with this at the next Finnish workshop, shall we? ;-)

I contrast those approaches in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EczPVIKIsU

While it's true that the name ezengileer is based on the word for stirrup, I think there's more to this: older singers tended to create more of a soundscape in which the rider is traveling. Younger singers now merely open and close their nasal ports and call it ezengileer. No snub to Ayan-ool Sam, as he's quite a fine singer. But that's how I hear that. I don't have the Sevek Aldyn-ool recording handy. And FWIW, one often hears Kaigal-ool work the nasal port in a similar fashion, but he doesn't call it ezengileer..

Hear are a few recordings to check out for educational purposes: http://khoomei.com/ezengileer/

Three examples by Oleg Kuular, Xanashataar-ool Oorzhak, and Marzhamal Ondar.

Very different approaches: Oleg, the youngest, performs a simpler oscillating effect, at about 2:40. MO and XO's styles are very different and much more evocative IMO. It's kinda tricky, as terms change in meaning over time. But there are some constants: the technique behind the style involves the rhythmic opening and closing of the nasal port. Other things may be occurring as well, ornamentally as well as including the basic technique such as khoomei vs kargyraa vs sygyt or combinations of those. The mouth may be open or closed, but usually is not wide open (very tough this way).

Sauli, I agree that one can get great percussive sounds by using the tongue and I do that a lot, but ezengileer really requires the technique of isolating and controlling the nasal port directly. Let's play with this at the next Finnish workshop, shall we? ;-)

I contrast those approaches in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EczPVIKIsU

Cheers,

Steve

Comment

You need to be a member of OMN to add comments. Sign up, it's free!

Join Overtone Music Network

Sponsored by:

Latest Activity

Sukadev Bretz posted a video

Yoga Kongress 2013: Konzert mit Klaus

Alle Yoga Vidya Events und Kongresse findest du unter http://www.yoga-vidya.de/center/haus-bad-meinberg/start/events-kongresse.html. Klaus führt das Publikum...
1 hour ago
A group by Marco Tonini was featured
Thumbnail

Overtone Singing Techniques

There are many ways to produce vocal overtones. It depends by the structure of our vocal tract -…See More
yesterday
Jens Mügge commented on the group 'Sound and Resonance at Power Places'
"Hi Skye, thanks for your comment on the comment wall of this group. There is another Gasometer in…"
yesterday
Kolja Simon posted photos
yesterday
Skye Løfvander commented on the group 'Sound and Resonance at Power Places'
"Gasometer Oberhausen Wikipedia: "The Gasometer Oberhausen is a former gas holder in…"
yesterday
Andrea Ferrara is now a member of OMN ...

Welcome Andrea Ferrara!
Friday
Iver Livendahl commented on Aurelio's video
Thumbnail

Des Bächleins Melodie

"Zwei schöne Instrumente! Thanx for sharing."
Wednesday
Franc Janssen posted photos
Apr 14

© 2014   sponsored by Yoga Vidya, Germany

 |  Support | Privacy  |  Terms of Service