Overtone Music Network

a common space & database for harmonic overtones

I can´t understand how silent is this forum....


Well, anyway. I have a cheap wireless headset but I am not satisfied to the sound. Yes, I am not satisfied to my sound eather, but it is better than what comes from my pa. Do you have any experiences about mikrophones that pick the overtones well.

Sauli

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Hi Sauli,

Yes, inexpensive wireless mics aren't going to do your voice justice. Unless you really need wireless, just get a decent vocal mic. For studio pros, there is always an effort to find the best available mic for each source, but any decent vocal mic (usually will have a cage/ball around the capsule) should make you a lot happier. I don't know about prices in Finland, but here you can often find something adequate for $100.00 or so.

If it sounds good on your regular voice, it's likely to sound good for throat-singing. If you like to sing extremely low, as I sometimes do, or like Kuvezin, then you might lost some lowest frequencies, but most not-really-speakers won't accurately reproduce those frequencies. Not usually a problem, though.

I've seen great throatsingers use SM58s and sound good enough for gigs.

Let me know if you need more info.

Steve
Yes, the Shure SM58 is an excellent choice. Experiment with placement to discover zones where the overtones are more prominent. You may find an off axis orientation is helpful.

HG
Hy, i use the ZOOM H2.
For better sound in combination with the OKM inear mic. The sound is good :-)
Carsten
Any professional mike should pick overtones with no problem and boosting the 1-3 khz range with equalizer can do wonders to them.
I'm an instrumentalist and I don't like the fuss with microphones lying all around, so i use just a couple. When recording on computer I use a Shure 8900 hooked to a Behringer mic100 tube pre-amp to warm up the sound, especially the mid-tone region. The Shure is rediculously sensitive, really love it! The main problem with picking up the full range of frequencies is the placing of the mic (as Harold noticed). I noticed that when recording singing, it's best the mic is tilted down towards the mouth from a position that is slightly too high. The mic capsule ( the head) faces a bit down and the mic body is at an angle of about 10 degrees. I think with overtone singing you should keep your mouth at a slightly greater distance from the mic than with normal singing, but that's just my theory, since I don't have any experience.
hi sauli,

to me the best microphones to pickup the overtones are large ribbon geometry (LRG) microphones like the AEA R84. they can take the same soundpressure like dynamic mics and have the same brilliance like condensor mics and they are realy sensitiv. in other words, the best of both worlds. but it is not only the microphon, which makes the sound. you need also a good cable and a good pre-amplifier. and beleave me, i am not talking like a blind about colours, i am recording instruments for 40 years. wireless mics don´t have a good sound and if, they are realy expensiv. it is better to work cable-bound.

i hope i could help you out.

swinging regards

wolfman
Hello everyone,

Thank you very much Jens for the invitation! I still keep an old "eagle" from the time I use to be in a band. A very reliable thing.

Best wishes, mjf
One thing to watch out for is proximity effect. With most microphones, except perhaps omni-directional ones, singing very close to it will exponentially boost lower frequencies, which might sound bad or good depending on your sound/style. To avoid this, experiment by leaving more space between your mouth and the microphone - I suspect you'll hear a big difference.

I agree that a standard dynamic mic is a good place to start, if you're looking to buy one. And, if you're looking at the Shure SM58 (or 57), I'd recommend one of the "beta" models. There's even wireless versions of those, although more expensive of course. Good luck!

--andy
Hi !
I don't really have a lot of experience with mikrophones that pick especially the overtones well. My main instrument is the Didge. I use the Audio-Technica AT-4041 and I'm very happy with it. Stephen Kent is using it live too. It's a small condenser Mic and it should work for your needs too. It's sensitive and clear but not too sensitive so you can use it on stage without feedback! I really like the sound of audio technica and the price is very good for the great performance! In my opinion the Price to Quality range is much much better than the common Mics from Shure ore AKG (You pay a lot for the Brand)! Audio Technica offers diferent Mics (Condenser and Dynamic) so I would guess to check some out to find a good one for overtones. May you find a Music-Store around where You can test the sound. In the end it's a question of what YOU like - and to what kind of technic the Mic is conected to... (Pre Amp, Mixer, PA , Speakers...)
Greetings from Bremen
Ole
Thanks to explosive discussion, helpfull and interresting. Yes, I have shure58, which is recommended by everyone but the problem is, while playin igil or morin khuur, I need to watch board ocationally and headset gives freedom. My friend is working in musicstore, maybe I make a research trip... I´ll report later, what I find out.
Hey Sauli!!
You are absolutly right!!
If you are singing a propper Tuvan Khoomei on stage, it is like singing Rock´n´Roll, us the good old SM58!! Yeah!!
SM58 - That is my advice as an professionell Khoomeiji with around 50 concerts a year, mostly in big concert halls & on festivals.
All my Tuvan friends, like Albert Kuvezin, Mongün-ool Ondar, Gendos & Radik Tulush, wich are all famous Khoomeiji use this mic, cause it belongs to the equipment wich concert halls have worldwide!!

Khoomei Folk Punk Greetings from Berlin!!

Arjopa & The Master U-like

Hi Sauli,
I have been distributing professional mic brands like AKG, Audio-Technica and Crown in Belgium years ago. My suggestion is that you take your time to try out several microphones for yourself. It is important that it sounds good for YOU, no matter what someone else thinks or uses. You have your own sound, your own timbre and your own opinion about “a good sound”.
If you want to stick to a wireless headset, I would suggest that you forget about the cheap stuff. Cheap wireless systems not only use cheap microphones, but the electronic parts are of poor quality too. That means that you’ll have drop-outs (less with diversity systems – using 2 antennas) every now and then, and that the noise level (hiss) could be quite high. Good wireless systems unfortunately have their price. You don’t necessarily have to get both microphone and wireless system from the same brand. Good wireless systems are AKG, Shure, Sennheiser. Good headworn mics are AKG, Countryman, Shure, Crown, Sennheiser. I wouldn’t go for less. But, as I said before, try it all out for yourself. Good luck.

Patrik

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